7 Singapore startup logo reviews

Singapore is the home of a whole community of interesting and exciting startups. One of the big problems that startups struggle with is initial branding including designing logos and websites. In many cases they don’t have the funds or internal talent to get a brand scheme in place.

In this article, I’ll look at some startups that have been making news in Singapore and take the opportunity to examine their logos as they appear today. Some of these firms, once they get funding, are able to invest in branding their firms more carefully. By and large, these firms are doing a great job, so don’t take this criticism too harshly – this is simply how I would approach coaching a client.

Kezaar

02-singapore-startup-logo-500

Kezaar is a platform for building your own training courses. You can develop a complete course on any topic and sell it through Kezaar.

This logo creation is an interesting, chaotic blend of the Chrome logo and Hootsuite. I like the connection of an owl to learning, but the lines and shapes don’t blend too well. A solid color would work great as a background and keep the negative space for the lines. It’s a good idea with poor execution.

 

Outfit Of The Day

03-singapore-startup-logo-500

Outfit of the Day is like Pinterest, but specifically for fashion. It has several social media elements to it for sharing and liking images.

The logo is actually operating system dependent, which has some drawbacks but interesting benefits as well. Depending upon what operating system you’re using, you’ll see this logo as either an Arial font (Windows) or Helvetica (Mac).

What I like about font-based logos is that they look great no matter what because fonts are basically small raster images that can be sized up to near infinity and retain their crisp, clean look. That’s the clear benefit.

But this application is a bit shortsighted. Using webfonts, the site could create a consistent look and feel for their logo that doesn’t shift with the operating system. On the other hand, this site will load a bit faster initially because the user does not have to download the webfont the first time they go to the site.

 

Ubersnap

04-singapore-startup-logo-500

Ubersnap is a photosharing site aimed directly at photographers. The idea is to create a place where photographers can upload their content and let fans, friends, and family know.

The logo comes in a couple of different versions. The one above is their most recent to be released and is a big improvement. It’s minimalist composition may be too minimalist, though. With only a bolded and italiced version of the word “snap” as a difference, the concept just doesn’t stand out.

While you don’t want your logo to be too eye-catching on a photography site, even a simple color change between the two words would create some interesting contrast and be more memorable.

 

Hagglr

05-singapore-startup-logo-500

Hagglr is an app to empower shoppers to buy as a group. While it hasn’t officially launched at the time of writing, the app has funding and should be on the streets shortly.

This is my favorite logo of the bunch, even though I couldn’t come up with a higher-resolution version. It resembles a price tag and somehow manages to avoid the “hag” reference. The negative space is a nice touch, giving this logo a lot of options with colors. The font choice is clean and simple. Well done!

 

Spawt

06-singapore-startup-logo-500

Spelled S-P-A-W-T, this cool little app is designed to help people find “experiences”, whether that’s at a restaurant or other venue.

I really enjoy the design of this logo with the scripted font and map pointer reference. My primary criticism is the letter “a” is difficult to discern, especially when the reader wants to automatically translate this word to “spot” by default.

The color choice is ‘spawt’ on, and I like how the drop shadow effect under the map pointer gives the logo a slight 3D effect.

 

DoctorPage

07-singapore-startup-logo-500

This company makes it easy to find and schedule appointments with a doctor nearby.

The logo is similar in composition to the Ubersnap logo, but manages to create a stronger contrast between Doctor and Page using font weights. The fonts are very basic and easy to read.

I think this logo could easily have integrated some kind of character into the design or other elements. Unlike Ubersnap – two words that don’t have a lot of concrete visual ideas from which to pull, both doctor and page are easy to design around. This feels like a missed opportunity.

 

Singapore River

01-singapore-startup-logo-500

This startup is built around beautification of the Singapore River precinct. While not a new project, the partnerships involved will bring a new life to this area.

A close second, this logo is beautifully done and culturally rich. From the waves to the fish-like shape to the hint of a sail boat, this logo has it all in terms of shapes.

My only concern with a design like this is the complexity of the shapes. It’s hard to remember brands that are simple, and the more complex, the more likely the viewer will forget. One way to simplify this logo would be to combine the colors and shapes in the left of the image whith the waves and then edit the logo to see if it functions without all the curves to the left (the waves / fish tail concept).

Overall a beautiful idea with lots of character. The concept just needs a little more refining to increase memorability.

Tara Hornor

Tara Hornor has a degree in English and has found her niche writing about marketing, advertising, branding, graphic design, and desktop publishing. She is a writer for DesignCrowd, which launched a Singapore crowdsourcing 2.0 marketplace in late 2012 and where over 100,000 graphic designers and graphic design studios from around the world provide their services for logos, websites, and print and graphic design projects.

 

Other Design Articles You May Find Interesting

One Comment | Write a Comment

  1. download says:

    this is awasome collection i like it

Follow My Twitter Subcribe Full RSS